Make your Thanksgiving even more thankful! Luxx Bourbon Apple Dulce de Leche Pie Recipe

Ready for the most amazing pie EVER?? Luxx Bourbon Apple Dulce de Leche Pie15109555_10207563418384513_5601104656615057030_n

This pie is more than wow. Pull out some local apples, bourbon, dark chocolate and Luxx Chocolat’s Mi Dulce Amor bourbon-infused dulce de leche and get ready for your taste buds to dance. One of our customers shared with us recently that she created a bourbon apple pie made with our unique dulce de leche and commented that not a person spoke until the pie was entirely gone because it was so amazing!  We took that inspiration and have created this recipe, with dark chocolate of course, that you can serve and be a star. Perfect for Thanksgiving dessert…and your guests will be thankful you did!

set-upIngredients

10 to 12 Apples (we used Honey Crisp)

1/4 cup butter

1 teaspoon sea salt

1 teaspoon cinnamon

3/4 teaspoon nutmeg

1 tablespoon maple syrup

5 tablespoons Woodford Reserve bourbon

Juice of 1 lemon

1/2 cup dark brown sugar

1 tablespoon flour

2 pie doughs or crusts (either store-bought or homemade)

2 jars Luxx Chocolat Mi Dulce Amor Bourbon Dulce de Leche (www.luxxchocolat.com or Super Cellars in Ridgewood NJ or Steve’s Market in Ramsey NJ)

70% dark chocolate

Preparation

The filling:

sauteed-applesIn a large sauté pan (high heat) add butter. Once melted, add the apples and season with salt, cinnamon and nutmeg. Sauté for a few minutes until apples are soft but still firm, about 6-8 minutes. Carefully add the bourbon–the apples may flame a bit. You may want to temporarily turn off the burner while you add the bourbon. Once the liquid evaporates, add in the lemon juice, maple syrup and dark brown sugar. Let the mixture cook until sugar is dissolved. Sprinkle the flour over the top and mix it in. Cook the mixture for a few more minutes until thickened.

The crust:

Choose either a store-bought crust or create your own! Get 2 10-inch pie pans.
rub-dulceRoll out the pie dough in put into 2 10” pans. Brush each with melted dark chocolate and let set…yes, you heard correctly!  This helps keep the crust crispy by creating a moisture barrier between the filling and the crust. And it adds an amazing flavor
choc-with-bowlnuance to the pie. Make sure the chocolate sets before you add the cool filling. Scoop the dulce de leche into the crust on top of the chocolate and spread evenly all over the crust. We like to
have it approximately ½” thick.

Pour in the cool apple filling, drizzle with more dulce de leche (all over) and top with pie dough, cutting in a few holes for venting or braided into a lattice. We cut the dough into shapes and laid each piece on top. Pinch edges of dough to seal. Trim excess crust. Crimp edges decoratively.putting-in-filling-over-dulce

with-cutter

in-oven    15073469_10207562887091231_6413340647876363116_n

Bake at 375F for 1 hour. Let the pie rest for at least an hour before serving. Heat and drizzle Mi Dulce Amor Bourbon Dulce de Leche on top each slice.  And be prepared to be speechless!!

Have you tried our recipe? Send us your pictures!  Happy Thanksgiving!

 

Like fairy tales? Not when it comes to wine or chocolate… Fairy tales Dispelled Part One

fairy-tales-002

Just when you think you have a good handle on something, surprise! Well, it’s time to dispel some common tales and partial truths associated with wine and chocolate. And since there are SO many, this is only the first part you’ll be reading. Knowledge is the key to better experiences and offering proper guidance to your family members. And you’ll also look even more brilliant at your next event or dinner party.

Better wines are sealed with a cork?

CorksNot necessarily. Screw capped wines can age just as well as a cork. And times are changing. Traditional cork is becoming a limited natural supply and has ongoing quality issues which impacts the ability to preserve wines from the negative effects of oxygenation on aging and wine preservation and even cork spoilage. Many wineries have been experimenting with plastic and plant-based polymer alternatives and screw caps and can attest that quality control is much easier and in many situations can improve wine aging. The use of these alternatives though are associated with cheap wine, right?

That image started to change about a decade ago, when commercial winemakers in New Zealand and Australia started using the enclosures much more widely for all kinds of wine, including some higher-end bottles. The fact is, screw caps have topped bottles from some of the world’s best wineries for about a decade, and even the most reputable wine critics openly acknowledge that there’s nothing wrong with sealing a wine bottle with a screw cap in lieu of a cork. New Zealand is leading the wine industry with the majority of wineries converting from cork to cap. Wineries in Australia, Spain, South Africa, South America, Canada, the U.S. and France are all testing the capping trend as well.

But even with many advantages over cork, expanded cap adoption really comes down to wine industry marketing reservations due to wine drinkers’ attachment to the pomp and circumstance of opening a bottle elegantly with a cork screw. What matters is what’s in the bottle, no?

Wine critics are always right?

winesnobWine criticism is a very particular thing. Everyone has a different palate although some wine reviewers may have fallen in line with your particular taste on an occasion or two. In order to be exactly in step with a wine critic, your expectations from any particular bottle of wine need to be shared. How do you really know you share the same taste? Our noses, mouths and brains vary in performance from one individual to the next. What it comes down to is learning what traits you like in different types of wines and to trust your palate. Ultimately, you are the one that counts.

Sweet wines pair best with chocolate?

cropped 90s beautySweet dessert, sweeter wine? Why? Forget those who think this is the only way to go. Remember, it’s about your palate, not a narrow-minded view on what makes a great experience. Please…no…  Don’t get caught in the sweet trap as it will limit your chocolate and wine pairing pleasure! Dessert wines, like Sauternes and Ports can make way for too much sweet going on. Occasionally a nice Port and a very dark high percentage and more bitter chocolate, ok. But how often do you really drink dessert wines? Your goal should be to compliment or provide a nice contrast with the actual flavors that exist in the many wines you enjoy normally…like smokiness, pepper, black berry, earth, cherry, honey etc. and not to overpower or compete on a sweetness level. It should be about flavors, scents and aromas! Note though that not every wine does go with chocolate, especially very dry tannic wines, so we’ll be discussing those principles as we go forward. It’s not a simple as it appears.

Stay tuned for the next fairy tale installment of wine and chocolate!

cropped Lisa press photoLisa Mecray Rogers, award-winning Master Chocolatier and Founder of Luxx Chocolat® xquisite artisan chocolate, ChocoVin Chocolate & Wine Tastings® and Luxx Academy du Chocolat offering classes with adults in mind, Ridgewood resident, recognized as one of 2014 and 2013 Best Chocolatiers & Confectioners in America. Luxx Chocolat offers unique handcrafted works of art. Nothing artificial, no preservatives, not mass produced.

www.luxxchocolat.com, luxxchocolat@optonline.net, 201-312-7936

“Women cannot live on chocolate alone. That’s why there’s wine”

wine-dark-chocolateOh, the decadence, the satisfaction and the pure joy that wine and chocolate can bring to our lives. Held high in admiration for centuries, these glorious substances stemmed from Mother Nature. They were deemed as gifts from the ancient Gods and prized for having special powers, offering medicinal properties, health benefits and even having a role in religious and fertility ceremonies and, of course, inspiring love and passion. There were many goddesses and gods connected to chocolate and wine around the world. The most well-known for chocolate being the Mayan Goddess Ixcacao, the God Ek-chuah and the major Gods of wine, Greek Dionysus and Roman Bacchus, the wine party God. We still highly revere the power of chocolate and wine today and perhaps worship them in our own way.

Did you know…?

  • The beginnings of chocolate are now believed to date back over 3,000 years with the Olmecs in Central America, not the Mayans
  • Cacao, meaning “God food”, was worshipped by the Olmecs, Mayans and Aztecs for its mystical and aphrodisiac properties. Chocolate is made from beans grown in pods on a cacao tree
  • Aztec emperor Montezuma, who had over 600 wives in his harem, is reputed to have consumed fifty golden goblets of chocolate a day to enhance his abilities
  • Casanova is even said to have indulged in chocolate before seducing his women
  • Cacao was so highly prized, the Aztecs used it as currency
  • The first solid chocolate bar was introduced in 1847 by a British chocolate company called Fry’s. Up until then, chocolate was consumed as a drink often mixed with spice, vanilla and honey
  • Wine is our most ancient alcoholic drink, perhaps dating back 10,000 years, and it still is held in high esteem
  • Wine is said to have saved growing populations from the diseases caused by bad water
  • In ancient Greece, a dinner host would take the first sip of wine to assure guests the wine was not poisoned, hence the phrase “drinking to one’s health”
  • “Toasting” started in ancient Rome when the Romans continued the Greek tradition but started dropping a piece of toasted bread into each wine glass to temper undesirable tastes or excessive acidity
  • Early Roman women were forbidden to drink wine, and a husband who found his wife drinking was at liberty to kill her. Both the Egyptians and Romans believed that women who drank were promiscuous and adulterers
  • An Italian study argues that women who drink two glasses of wine a day have better sex than those who don’t drink at all

But even though wine and chocolate have been associated with excess, they don’t have to be guilty pleasures. Today we know, in fact, that both dark chocolate and red wine have magical qualities as they contain vital antioxidants that, in moderation, may help prevent cancer, heart disease and other illnesses. We will explore these and other health benefits throughout the summer!

Cheers!

cropped Lisa press photoLisa Mecray Rogers, award-winning Master Chocolatier and Founder of Luxx Chocolat® xquisite artisan chocolate, ChocoVin Chocolate & Wine Tastings® and Luxx Academy du Chocolat offering classes with adults in mind, Ridgewood resident, recognized as one of 2014 and 2013 Best Chocolatiers & Confectioners in America. Luxx Chocolat offers unique handcrafted works of art. Nothing artificial, no preservatives, not mass produced.

www.luxxchocolat.com, luxxchocolat@optonline.net, 201-312-7936